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this city or its people five years after katrina devastated the gulf coast. >> it was a natural disaster, but also a manmade catastrophe. >> mitchell: i'm russ mitchell. also tonight, a force for change. the new top cop here battles a history of corruption inside the new orleans police force. rescue efforts are set to begin to save those trapped chilean miners, as the government seeks a plan to reach them sooner. and pitching in: the legendary music makers of new orleans and how they helped rebuild this city. ♪ captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with russ mitchell. >> mitchell: and good evening from new orleans. august 29, 2010: it has been a cloudy, rainy day here, but no match at all for what this city saw on august 29 five years ago when hurricane katrina rolled in with a vengeance. in the next 30 minutes, we'll take a look at new orleans' past, present and future. but first, the news of the day. president obama ended his vacation this sunday and came here to new orleans to pay his respects and make some promises. here is senior white house correspondent bill
katrina, talking about the city's long road back. also what he says tonight about the latest crisis in the gulf, the economy and those questions about his faith. "nightly news" begins now. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> and good evening, we're with you tonight from the gentilly neighborhood of new orleans chtd and if it doesn't look like old new orleans, it's because this particular housing complex, which the president came to see today, is brand new. and like a lot of things here, it's controversial among some because it replaced what was here. well, it was five years ago tonight that katrina had swept through, we knew it was a history-making storm. but we didn't yet know what it would do to this city or how badly places like mississippi had been hit. in fact, here is some of how we covered katrina on our broadcast that very night five years ago. >> just before dawn, katrina heads northwest straight for the coast. >> the eye of the storm is completely over us right now. with winds gusting in excess of 90 miles per hour. >> you don't have to go far to find scenes
,800 people died from katrina, mainly in louisiana and mississippi. remember, this area took a second hit a few weeks later with hurricane rita and it was still struggling to recover where the gulf oil disaster hit just this spring. the recovery here in new orleans has been held by $16.5 billion in federal funds for the region and many other people who love this city, including author tom piazza. he took me on a tour of some of the hardest hit neighborhoods and introduced me to some of his friends along the way. so, tom, this is the 17th street canal. >> here is where one of the most serious breaches happened during katrina. if you had visited t eed this p two or three months after the storm, four months after the storm, six months after the storm, it looked truly like a war zone. just destruction every place, smashed houses, overturned cars. >> how jarring of a contrast is it to have a home, obviously, once here and now completely gone. the family choosing not to rebuild and then you look two steps away and you have a home on stilts. >> well, different people have different levels of tol
new documentary and what the bp oil spill has meant to the city five years after katrina. >>> this is msnbc's special coverage, live from new orleans. here's tamron hall. >>> good afternoon, everyone. live in the french quarter in new orleans and welcome to our special coverage of katrina. at this moment, five years ago, katrina was still gaining strength in the gulf of mexico. people had no idea what it would do to this historic city and this region. katrina finally hit here five years ago this sunday, as a category 3 storm with 125-mile-per-hour winds, it left 80% of new orleans under water. 1.5 million people were evacuated in the aftermath, 1,800 people would die in the gulf region. the lower ninth ward, not far from where we are is the hard e hit part of new orleans when the levees failed. we saw horrifying pictures of people stranded on rooftops waiting to be rest cued. according to a new estimate, about 25,000 people who lived there before katrina, only 1,000 have returned to what's called the nine. thousands of people sought shelter at the new orleans convention c
>>> on our broadcast tonight from new orleans, five years later. after katrina, the state of this city and the entire gulf coast, the state of the oil spill and the rhythm of everyday life after the storm. the rhythm of everyday life after the storm. "nightly news" begins now. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >> announcer: hurricane katrina, five years later. this is a special edition of nbc "nightly news" with brian williams. reporting tonight from new orleans. >>> good evening from the french quarter in new orleans where five years ago tonight it was still a few days off. we could see it out there. we knew katrina was a big one, but we had no idea what it would do to this city and this region. back then when the storm hit, it covered an area of 90,000 square miles. 80% of this great, historic city was underwater. 1.5 million people were affected in that storm's aftermath and, worst of all, of course, more than 1,800 deaths at the hands of katrina. things these days here are getting much better, in part thanks to a fortune, a potential pool of $16.7 billion i
hurricane katrina. it almost did the same thing this weekend on america's beaches. we'll tell you why it turned into rescues for the record books on east coast shores. >>> dr. king is the one to dreamt it. glenn beck wants to make it his reality. civil rights leaders and many americans say, not so fast. can a white conservative become the new face of the civil rights movement? hello, every, i'm don lemon reporting live tonight from the lower ninth ward in new orleans. we're here to chronicle a comeback of a neighborhood, of a city, an entire coastal region, really, five years ago today hurricane katrina slammed into the gulf coast with obviously devastating results. this is an aerial photograph of the area where i'm standing right now. this is how it looked five years ago when the levees broke and a barge floated right into the frabd from the adjoining canal. this is what it looks like right now. this is the lower ninth ward, tennessee street, among the streets in this very neighborhood. of course, this is where brad pitt has been putting much of his effort in the make it right founda
katrina has devastated new orleans. and some at the hays takes a look back of the disaster and a long road to recovery. >> visiting new orleans five years to the day after katrina struck, president of brock a bomb a promise not to forget. >> the city has become a symbol of resilience and community. and the responsibility that we have to one another. >> this is a disaster they still live with every day. neighbors in st. bernard paris gathered inside the church where they had more of their loved ones killed in a storm-the devastating aftermath. >> today we come together to bury katrina. in >> side as a border casket is the memories of what could turn a tip from them five years ago. their homes their loved ones and for a while even hope. >> katrina's but in moving forward if we carry with us the guests that have been offered. these experiences that we have been stored have made us better. >> in the lore 94, the celebrated in the street and tumor nor lean sorrow. . not everyone is back. but the view from always front porch, >> so glad that we came home. i hope we don't have another one. >> a c
at all for what this city saw on august 29th five years ago when hurricane katrina rolled in with a ven sense-- vengence. in the next 30 minutes we'll look at new orleans past, present and future but we begin with the news of the day. president obama ended his vacation this sunday and came here to new orleanss to pay his respects and to make some promises. here's senior white house correspondent bill plante. >> reporter: fresh were their vacation on martha's vineyard the obama's family first stop was for lunch. >> i'm going to try alligator sausage. >> reporter: like most of the city this popular restaurant was underwater after katrina roared through. an historically black xavier university another successful rebound story, mr. obama hailed the city's renaissance but admitted new orleans still has a long way to go. >> there's still too many people unable to find work. nd there's still too many new orleans yan folks who haven't been able to come nome. -- home. i wanted to come here and tell the people of this city directly, my administration is going it to stand with you and fight alongs
-e-l-l-o [ child giggles ] >>> it was the storm long feared, five years ago today. hurricane katrina unleashed a fury that devastated the gulf coast. in the end, katrina took 1800 lives and scarred the region forever. still today, people of louisiana, mississippi, alabama struggle to recover. but the courage of the people and determination provide a ray of hope for better tomorrow. good morning, everyone. i'm tamron hall. we are in new orleans this morning, marking the five years since hurricane katrina hit. >> good morning, tamron. i'm alex witt at msnbc world headquarters in new york and following the day's other top stories for you. a close watch on three storms out in the atlantic, including the new hurricane earl that is gaining strength right now as moves into the caribbean. >>> also going to preview the president's speech on iraq this week. we're going to see what we can expect him to say about america's future in the country. >>> word of chile from a new report to rescue trapped miners but will it get them out earlier than projected? >>> first, we'll begin with you, tamron in new orlea
hurricane katrina, and the inspiring story of xavier xuniversity president, dr. norman francis. he lost his home during the storm and what is unspeakable damage that forced xavier to close for nearly five months. but they became a metaphor for the beating heart of new orleans. tonight, we will hear his story of loss, survival, hope, and renewal in his own words. our look at new orleans, five years after hurricane katrina, coming up right now. >> all i know is his name is james, and he needs extra help with his reading. >> i'm james. >> yes. >> to everyone making a difference, you help us all live better. >> nationwide insurance supports tavis smiley. with every question and answer, nationwide insurance is happy to help tavis improve financial literacy and remove obstacles to economic empowerment one conversation at a time. nationwide is on your side. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. [captioning made possible by kcet public television] tavis: among the many facets that makes new orleans the great city is its deep-rooted college community. schools
million in school aid. and five years after katrina, new orleans' struggle to recover in a tale of two buildings. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> hill: good if i had evening, katie is off tonight. harry smith will join us a bit later from new orleans. we begin, though, tonight, with the economy and new concern that the recovery from the recession may be stalling. the government put out a new report today showing growth in the second quarter was just 1.6%. and that's far less than an earlier estimate of 2.4% and less than half the growth rate in the first quarter. in a speech watched closely by wall street, federal reserve chairman ben bernanke said the fed is ready to take action if necessary. anthony mason is here now with more about that. anthony? >> reporter: erica, bernanke did not forecast another recession, but he did acknowledge the economy is slowing. at an economic conference in jackson hole, wyoming, the fed chairman said the recovery is on fragile footing. the economy, he said, rem
this weekend that hurricane katrina slammed into the gulf coast, the costliest and one of the deadliest natural disaster this is country has ever seen. more than 1,800 people dead, more than $81 billion in damage. in new orleans, the population fell from 1.3 million to 988,000 as people fled the city. today it is back up to 1.2 million. but there's so much more to this story than the numbers. five years ago, president bush stood in jackson square and vowed to rebuild the city better than it was. harry smith is in jackson square tonight to check on the progress of that promise. harry? >> smith: erica, good evening. with hurricane katrina's storm surge, nearly every levee in this city was breached. 80% of the city was underwater and as don teague tells us, rebuilding the infrastructure so it doesn't happen again is an enormous challenge. >> reporter: it's a massive construction project. the army corps of engineers is spending $14.3 billion to bolster new orleans' hurricane protection system. but in new orleans, lower ninth ward, residents of the area hardest hit by c.a.t. c.a.t. aren't convinced
years ago today the worst natural disaster in u.s. history started to unfold. hurricane katrina slamming into the gulf coast with catastrophic fury leaving 1,800 people dead and a region forever scarred. still today the region struggles to recover, but the courage of its people and their determination provide a ray of hope for better and brighter tomorrow. good morning, everyone. i'm tamron hall. we are in new orleans this morning on this fifth anniversary of hurricane katrina. >> and good morning to you, tamron and all of you out there. i'm alex witt here at msnbc world headquarters in new york. i'm following the day's other top stories, and we are keeping watch on three storms in the atlantic, including the new hurricane earl. it is gaining strength right now as it moves into the caribbean. plus there is word out of chile about a new effort to rescue those trapped miners, but will it get them out any earlier than first projected? we'll get to that, but let's start with you, tamron, in new orleans. >> thank you, alex. new orleans is marking this solemn day with several events across the
shown for so long. it was five years ago sunday that hurricane katrina roared ashore here in louisiana. winds of 125 to 130 miles an hour. it was a category 3 storm. by the time all was said and done, 1, 800 people had been killed, more than 1 1/2 million people displaced. as you see from these pictures from five years ago, vast areas of the city were submerged under ten feet of water. where i'm standing now in the lower ninth ward was as much as 15 feet under water in some places. at the time people were wondering how could the city ever come back from a near-fatal blow like this? well, it has been a monumental effort. over the past five years, billions upon billions of dollars spent. now, after all is said and done, much of the city is back. in some areas it's back better than ever. but places like here in the ninth ward, the lower seventh ward, there are areas where it was like yesterday that hurricane katrina came through. there's been a lot of progress. no question. here in louisiana, mississippi, other areas that were so devastated by hurricane katrina. but there sti
a difference. new orleans five years after katrina. we'll look at those working so hard here at things like education and health care. >>> and you may know him as brad pitt, but around here in the lower ninth ward he's known as the guy making new homes available for families. the guy making new homes available for families. "nightly news" begins now. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> good evening. this is it. we are back in the lower ninth ward tonight, the one iconic post katrina new orleans neighborhood people have heard about all over the world. the old neighborhood was all still here in place five years ago tonight. that's because katrina was still offshore in the gulf, bearing down, but still at least two days out. the flood wall behind us is new. when the old one failed, this neighborhood got blown to pieces, washed away. it became, as we said, an icon for the damage and the suffering. we'll see how the lower ninth ward is faring in just a moment. we want to begin tonight instead with the economy. we got more evidence today that it slowed to an absolute crawl this spri
>> aextrh@extraextraextraextrae destaca el de 2004, katrina el del 2005 extraextraextraextraex haitÍ. iniciamos con aextraextr aniversario del exÓn katrina, y cambióexh@extraextraextraextr de cientos de personas. ricardo regresÓ extrextrtraal lugar de y nos cuenta todo lo que ha sucedido en la zona desde entonces. >> con $ 86 mil millones en pÉrdidas aaaaaextraextraextrh@ea >> primero azotÓ la costa de mississippi donde el mar se elevÓ casi 30 pies, arrasando con el 90% de las edificaciones costeras. nueva orleans parecÍa haberse pero -salvado del viento. a raÍz de las labores de limpieza y reconstrucciÓn muchos hispanos se beneficiaron, incluso algunos se quedaron a vivir en la zona. cinco aÑos despuÉs, a principios de 2010, la ciudad rebasaba de optimismo. en nueva orleans extraeviviÓ l recesiÓn económica que afectÓ al paÍs, pero entonces, el 20 deail cuando una traextraextrae la poblaciÓn representa el 78% de los habitantes pre katrina. sin embargo hay extraexh@extraea apenas 13% poseen tÍtulo universitario. asÍ quedÓ la costa el 29 de agosto h@extra
years since katrina. we're coming to you tonight from musician's village, a new complex built in the upper ninth ward to honor local musicians and others, giving them a place to live. it's built by volunteers from habitat for humanity. 82 homes and duplexes built here. one of the many signs rebuilding and rebirth in this city. we'll show you more of it coming up tonight and check in on the situation with those fema trailers and mobile homes. who can forget them? we'll talk to a couple who bought their trailer from fema, but a purchase they're paying for with their health. we tested it and found it highly contaminated with formaldehyde, something the couple says fema knew and pushed the purchase anyway. making this city right for generations to come. looks like they're on the right track. we'll talk to some kids at a charter school here. keeping them honest. five years since katrina. it's easy to rewrite history and easy to forget the disasters that made a natural disaster into a man-made cat as trophy. easy for pundits, reporters and relief workers to have selective recall, ea
'm don lemon. "in the wake of hurricane katrina" will start in just a little bit. we'll leave you with the sounds of new orleans. mr. woods, a blues guitarist. ♪ when the saints go marching in ♪ >>> good evening again from new orleans. five years since katrina. we're coming to you tonight from musician's village, a new complex built in the upper ninth ward to honor local musicians and others by giving them a place to live. it's been built by volunteers from habitat for humanity. there's 82 homes and duplexes built here. one of the many signs of rebuilding and rebirth in this city. we'll show you more of it coming up tonight. we'll also check on with the situation of those fema trailers and mobile homes. we'll talk to a couple who bought their trailer from fema, but it's a purchase they're paying for with their health. we tested the mobile home and found it highly contaminated with formaldehyde. >>> and what some call the biggest experiment and the greatest chance in making this city right for generations to come. we'll talk to some kids at a charter school here. >>> five years
katrina made landfall in the gulf coast, hitting mississippi, alabama, and of course new orleans, leaving those states devastated by this monster storm that roared into this region, taking 1,800 lives, displacing more than a million people, many of whom are still trying to get home. good morning, everyone. i'm tamron hall in new orleans marxing five years since hurricane katrina hit. >> good morning, tamron. i'm alex witt here at msnbc world headquarters in new york. we'll have the top stories for you, including the situation in the atlantic with two hurricanes, danielle and earl. >>> also, president obama's busy week ahead beginning in just a few hours with his trip to new orleans, and then his upcoming speech on iraq. >>> but we'll begin this hour with you, tamron, in new orleans. >> thank you, alex. hurricane katrina hit here five years ago today, and this morning we are taking a revealing look at the lasting impact and the progress made as this vital part of our country continues to recover. i'm reporting from artillery park. it's, in fact, just across from jackson square. you see st.
, devastation never seen before in an american city. now five years after hurricane katrina, new orleans is still on the road to recovery. tamron hall is live in new orleans for us. and good day to you, tamron. >> good day, nora. we've talked so much about where the folks in the gulf coast are right now compared to the images that we saw five years ago almost to this day. even the weather today is kind of an eerie feel, a reminder of how mother nature can certainly turn her wrath on us. but the new mayor of new orleans said something very interesting yesterday. he was talking about and he compared it to gumb ocht and the recovery effort is just a mix of everybody getting together and making this work. there are great stories of recovery. i was in the lakeview community where new homes have gone up, where people have started over. but then we've also traveled to the lower nine where out of the 20,000 families who were there, about 4,000 have returned. and you still see the eerie mark of an x that that home was searched and a body found there. you would think over time that the marks on th
." >>> this is a very special edition of the fox report. remembering hurricane katrina. five years after the storm hit. we'll have live coverage from the gulf with trace gallagher as well as the top stories of the day. i'm julie banderas. we are live as fox reports tonight. >> so much lost. >> how in the world we recover from this -- how new orleans recovers from this is behind comprehension. >> so much gain. >> people coming back strong but need a lot of h help. >> heartbreak. >> it was never always going to be whole. >> and hope years after hurricane katrina came barreling ashore and changed the landscape forever. >> i put -- i put -- i know one thing, i'm here to stay. >> tonight, a special look back as the gulf moves forward five years later. plus, they came to help. but stayed to learn and to live. >> seeing people who we have helped build their house turn around and want to help us with other people's houses, that was really a turning point. >> tonight, the story of the volunteers still giving their time and getting back much more in return. we'll have the rest of today's top stories in just a m
the headlines now at the top of the hour. tomorrow will be five years since hurricane katrina devastated the gulf coast. president obama will be in new orleans to market anniversary and today conservative talk show host glenn beck welcomed a large crowd to his restoring honor rally. he touted the event as a way to get back to values and at the same time civil rights activists held their own march in washington marking the 47th anniversary of martin luther king jr.'s "i have a dream" speech. >>> first up, the first family is wrapping up a ten day vacation in martha's vineyard. tomorrow it is back to business for president obama. dan is traveling with the president and he says president obama continues to be focused on fixing the u.s. economy but plan as foreign policy push come september. >> reporter: after recharging his batteries during his martha vineyard's say karks president obama's back to workweek may just leave him asking for more down time. on his schedule, a major prime time oval office address on iraq, a visit to u.s. troops in texas, then two days of mideast peace face to face
that this hour. hurricane katrina was a terrible storm but it was the levee failures that flooded new orleans. are the levees safe today. >>> as the combat troops leave iraq, what did the invasion really change? it's hard to believe that was five years ago when hurricane katrina slammed ashore. entire communities along the u.s. gulf coast were decimated. 1,723 people died. the lives of 100,000 more changed forever. some areie reuniting and sharin stories. the president ask firnd first l in new orleans. he is expected to speak at the university in new orleans. jean is there again to take us back to five years ago, and then also help us look forward to what people there are looking forward in terms of rebuilding ask change. what are some of your first thoughts as you return to new orleans, jean? >> well, you can't help but be struck when you're here in the french quarter at how normal things seem here. yes, there are remembrances, for instance, the katrina exhibit is open at one of the museums here just yesterday. but when you go to other parts of the city, when you go to the lower ninth ward,
's dream. >>> we want to turn now to our coverage of hurricane katrina. it crashed into the gulf coast five years ago sunday, tomorrow. now, here in new orleans, there are places where everything seems normal. almost like nothing ever happened. but just around the corper, there are vivid reminders of what did happen. and what hasn't been made right. now, you might remember the painful images, we all do, for the rest of this hour we're going to explore the issues like race and class. i'll talk about it with the man who was mayor, ray nagin. i'll also talk with the man none of us had ever heard of before hurricane katrina, but who none of us would ever forget once he arrived on the scene. we'll hear from general russel honore himself. plus, we'll head next door to mississippi where the storm wreaked havoc across the entire coast line. an inspiring example of how people there pulled together. >>> still ahead here tonight -- >> i, too, have a dream. it is in my dreams. i have a dream that one day soon god's love -- >> who owns a dream. the niece of martin luther king jr. uses a famous words of
killer. sold to kids. okay. i'm don lemon on the fifth anniversary of hurricane katrina. it is a very wet and rainy evening. we're standing right across from the cafe. you're looking to live picture. we were in there earlier. we got some coffee. if you come to new orleans, you must do that and you must take advantage of the local cuisine and music. i will come back to atlanta about ten pounds heavier. in the meantime, we'll see you back here at 7:00 p.m. eastern and 10:00 p.m. eastern and make sure you join us at 7:00 p.m. for my quofrgs the former mayor of the city, ray nagin. in the meantime, "the situation room" starts right now. >>> a new explosion of deadly violence in iraq as president obama prefires mark the end of u.s. combat mission. are iraqi forces and american troops left behind prepared for the worst? >>> plus, five years after hurricane katrina. new tests of the levees and survivors' fears. is new orleans at risk of another flood disaster? >>> and a massive egg recall grows to become the largest in recent history. officials fear the entire nation could be e
for the state of mississippi. >> as we mark the fifth anniversary of hurricane katrina, look back at the response to the crisis. it is online at the c-span library. washington, your way. >> now, a conversation on the state of the levees in new orleans five years after hurricane katrina. from today's "washington journal," this is about 45 minutes. host: joining us from new orleans is karen durham- aguilera, the task force hope leader for the army corps of engineers. guest: thanks for inviting me here today. this reduction system we are building for greater new orleans and the surrounding parishes, i oversee the program and look at the budgeting aspects. one of the things i enjoy the most is the tremendous stakeholder engagement between our levee authorities and the public in louisiana and the parishes. especially the public, they are so involved in what we did and did give us a lot of help with input and solutions. host: how would you tell someone the difference between the levee system now and five years ago? guest: five years ago, we did not know as much as we know today. there i
'm don lemon live from new orleans. fifth anniversary of hurricane katrina. i'll see you back here at 10:00 p.m. eastern. i'm going to show you some sights and sounds of new orleans. it is a beautiful evening. it started out to be a very rainy day but it ended on a beautiful note. there you see the artists in jackson square painting. there's a who dat nation, talking about the new orleans saints. "in katrina's wake" is up next. see you back here at 10:00. >>> good evening again from new orleans. five years since katrina. we're coming to you tonight from musician's village, a new complex built in the upper ninth ward to honor local musicians and others by giving them a place to live. it's been built by volunteers from habitat for humanity. some of whom who are here tonight. there are 82 homes and duplexes built here. 90 more homes under construction in the neighborhood. one of the many signs rebuilding and rebirth in this city. we'll show you more of it coming up tonight and check in on the situation with those fema trailers and mobile homes. who can forget them? we'll talk to a couple wh
>>> this morning on "early today," remembering katrina. the gulf coast marks the anniversary of the storm that shook the nation five years ago. >>> free at last. jimmy carter comes to the rescue of an american detd in north korea. >>> under the sea. spectacular new images of underwater creatures off the spectacular new images of underwater creatures off the coast of indonesia. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> hello and good morning. welcome to our viewers across the nation, including the pacific time zone. i'm lynn berry and today we begin with five years later. hurricane katrina moved into the gulf of mexico five years ago this week before growing into one of the most devastating hurricanes in u.s. history. nbc's jay gray is in new orleans where the city that was hardest hit is still struggling to recover. jay, good morning. >> reporter: good morning, lynn. a testimony to the violent power of the storm, the definitetation that still lingers here. katrina almost as strong as the unbreakable spirit of the survivors here. the storm's been gone for a long time n
a person of interest but is not suspected of any crime. >> carolyn: five years after hurricane katrina. looking back at what was lost why moving forward along the gulf coast. and a documentary filmmaker brings the disaster to life in a film shown today here in san francisco. >> leigh: it has been a cool weekend. toward came up a few degrees today. beautiful shot for you. clear skies across the bay area. low clouds move in tonight, but @ú@ú t t tgsatax [ male announcer ] presenting the cadillac "summer's best" sales event. a fantastic opportunity to get 0% apr financing on every new 2010 cadillac model. like the cts sport sedan. the most acclaimed vehicle in its class and a "car and driver" 10 best, three years in a row. or the all new cadillac srx luxury crossover. and even the most acclaimed luxury suv ever, the cadillac escalade. summer brings out the best in all of us. hurry in to get 0% apr financing on every new 2010 cadillac during cadillac's "summer's best" sales event, going on now at your cadillac dealer. ♪ >> closed captioning brought to >> carolyn: in new orleans, neighb
it is still as is after katrina. >> sitting on your porch swinging. >> st steps was all tafs left of my house. i say it's like a little memorial to let us know what we went through. i take it one day at a time. i enjoy it one day. tomorrow i'll enjoy that day. >> days that bring challenges and surprises five years after the storm. >> that's what i do. >> hello, everyone. stick around. we have a special hour for you on cnn. we're reporting on the from the lower ninth ward of new orleans where five years ago today hurricane katrina crashed ashore. look at this aerial photo of where i'm standing now. this is how it looked five years ago. this is what it looks like right now. this is the lower ninth ward. we are on tennessee street where brad pitt is building a number of homes here through his make it right foundation. this is what the city of new orleans needs to look like and be more dense than this in the coming years. we all remember the painful images of death and devastation. the winds, the rains and the floods that followed. most of coastal mississippi literally washed away. mu
huracanes, son peligrosos >>> ya hablando de huracanes, ha hay que recordar cuando el huracán katrina, afectó, cientos de vidas se afectaros muchos perdieron todo lo estados unidos tenían 5 años después, hablamos con una sobreviviente y tenemos la historia de lucha y optimismo ♪ [ m ú s i c a ] >>> el domingo se cumplieron 5 años de que estas imágenes le dieran la vuetla al mundo >>> hace 4 años cuando solamente habían transcurrido 365 días del huracán katrina, ella, le contaba a univisión su saldo personal a raiz del paso del huracán >>> al final de la vida, estar agradecida por haber tenido esta oportunidad, para descubrir la personas que realmente soy sí, y de tener la oportunidad de hacer algo importante y bueno para la humanidad >>> 5 años después, ya totamente establecida, dice que muchas cosas han cambiado >>> no pude dejar de llorar, lloraba constantemente, ahora estoy muy feliz tengo una vida nueva, no miro hacia atrás >>> pero llegar a este punto no ha sido fácil, vivió en 18 lugares diferentes vivió por la buena voluntad de sus amigs >>> este peque
the fifth anniversary of hurricane katrina hitting new orleans. we'll take you there for a closer look at the then and the now, all kinds of great guests this hour. from the cnn center, this is "cnn saturday morning." 8:00 a.m. here in atlanta, 7:00 a.m. in new orleans and 5:00 a.m. waking up early, early on west coast in san diego. i'm brook bolduan. good morning. t.j. holmes is off this weekend. thank you for starting your stat day with me. >>> also over the next of the 90 minutes we're talking hurricanes, not just part here but present. look at danielle swirling in the atlantic. the good news here is it is weakening. we'll show you where danielle is headed. also we're going to be looking back and retracing the path of katrina along with this man. general russel honore became the face of how the government is supposed to work. he restored order to the chaos and this morning he'll joip me for a candid conversation of the then and the now. >>> also, in california, inmates riot at a legendary prison and guards open fire. what am i talking about? johnny cash fans? this is folsom prison.
from new orleans. five years since katrina. we're coming to you tonight from musicians' village, a new complex built in the upper ninth ward to honor local musicians and others by giving them a place to live. it's been built by volunteers from habitat for humanity. some of whom who are here tonight. along with americorps workers and others. there are 82 homes and duplexes built here. 90 more homes under construction in the neighborhood. one of the many signs rebuilding and rebirth in this city. we'll show you more of it coming up tonight and check in on the situation with those fema trailers and mobile homes. who can forget them? we'll talk to a couple who bought their trailer from fema, but it's a purchase they're paying for with their health. we tested the mobile home, found it highly contaminated with formaldehyde, something the couple says fema knew, and pushed through the purchase anyway. >>> educating the kids of new orleans. it was what some call the biggest experiment and the greatest chance for making this city right for generations to come. looks like they're on the right tra
years ago today, hurricane katrina battered the gulf coast, mississippi, alabama and new orleans left devastated by the monster storm taking 1800 live, displaying more than 1 million people, many of whom still trying know to get home. good morning, i'm tamron hall in new orleans marking the five years since hurricane katrina hit this region. >> good morning to all of you, i'm alex witt at msnbc world headquarters in new york and following the day's other top stories including the situation in the atlantic with hurricane danielle and tropical storm earl. earl is expected to become a hurricane soon. and president obama's busy week ahead, beginning in a few hours with his trip to new orleans. and then his upcoming speech on iraq. but we're going to start with you, tamron, there in louisiana. >> reporter: thanks, alex. this morning we look back five years later as the gulf region struggles to heal, rebuild and reassess the mistakes we all watched so this will never happen again. right now i'm reporting from artillery park, across from jackson square. you see the beautiful image of st. lou
.com. have a great weekend. >>> five years ago today, hurricane katrina unleashed its fury on the gulf coast. and on this anniversary, the gulf region remembers lives and livelyhoods lost to the storm as it celebrates survival. president obama and his family are in new orleans to mark anniversary and to remind people of the administration's commitment to help. the president spoke just last hour at xavier college. >> i wanted to come here and tell the people of this city directly, my administration is going to stand with you and fight alongside you until the job is done. until new orleans is all the way back. [ applause ] >> all the way. >> correction, at xavier university cnn white house correspondent dan lothian in new orleans traveling with the president. he renewed his commitment and he also talked about the matched efforts between the recovery post-katrina and even the bp oil spill. >> that's right. all of those topics. and the sound you just played from the president really was the theme of his remarks here today, where he's pointing out that the government really will do everything in
on studio b. first from fox at 3:00, welcome to the events marking five years since hurricane katrina hit the gulf south. on this day, august 26, 2005, katrina swirled around in the gulf of mexico and it passed over florida. was gaining strength on the way toward the coast. it thought louisiana was in its landfall. or everyone seemed to. mississippi, instead, took the hit. when days nearly 2,000 people would be dead, desperate survivors clinging to rooftops or looking for food and water. 80 percent of new orleans would be submerged. millions of people would lived and worked in katrina's path would find their world torn apart. in the first days after it hit there was in relief in the hardest hit areas but cameras, and writers and reporters to she the world what was happening documenting history. fox was broadcasting from new orleans and across the gulf south. tonight, the organizers here at the museum are opening a one year exhibit on hurricane katrina, a 250,000 foot museum of the news, and officials say on the web site it blends five centuries of news history with up to the second techno
, thanks so much. >>> five years after hurricane katrina devastated new orleans and the gulf region like nothing we've seen before the images were heart breaking, it looked like a third world country and the storm killing over 1,800 people mostly in new orleans and mississippi and over 700 people are categorized as missing in louisiana and experts say it's almost impossible to determine the exact death toll. msnbc has team coverage with a host of correspondents blanketing the region includic tamron hall in new orleans and jeff in mississippi. the big question, tamron, what has changed now that we're five years down the line? >> interesting enough, thomas, i asked so many people that question and it's individual. some people say their lives have changed and they have come back and new orleans is a better new orleans. some say it will never be the same. i heard a gentleman say when he dies he wants his ashes sprinkled in the lower nine. he always wants to be part of that community. listen to this number 18,000 families were there when hurricane katrina hit and 1,800 returned. you are ready
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